Saturday, July 05, 2008

Slow Food Nation's Victory Garden



The central lawn in Civic Center Plaza was being bulldozed on Thursday morning much to everyone's bewilderment.



Signage advised that this was part of Slow Food Nation's "Come To The Table" event scheduled for this Labor Day Weekend.



There is an extensive website (click here) with a list of events, which includes a July 12th planting of a "victory garden" and tickets for expensive "Slow Food" feasts at various restaurants during the Labor Day Weekend, from Acme Steakhouse to the Hayes Street Grill. There are also offerings of "slow hikes" and "slow journeys" and a "slow food" rock concert, along with "Taste" pavilions down at Fort Mason.



My favorite event is the titular "Come To The Table" on Thursday, August 28th, which is "invitation only." Here's the website's description:
"For Slow Food leaders to celebrate the conclusion of the National Congress and initiation of Slow Food Nation, Come to the Table is an open-air dinner for 500 people seated around the Slow Food Nation Victory Garden in Civic Center. The meal, celebrating the urban-rural partnerships and dedicated leaders that make the event possible, is casual and served family-style at long tables."
I wonder if they will be inviting me.

6 comments:

Spots said...

That's my birthday. You're already booked...

sfmike said...

Dear Beth: I got the month wrong for "Come to The Table." It's this August 28th, not next January 28th. So please don't worry about any cross-booking.

Sam said...

Doubt they'll invite me either. You don't need to be a member of a club or have a badge to forge urban-rural partnerships. For some of us its a simple way of living already. Don't need a festival to endorse my values.

namastenancy said...

I thought that the point of "Slow Food" was also sustainable farming. I shudder to think what this will cost the city -first the tearing up, then the putting back. Slow food events only work for the aristo; the plebs have got to get back to work. Their 30 minute lunch breaks don't allow them to linger over lunch.

Sam said...

I disagree with namatenancy. We grew up poor and my parents both went out to work and grew much of their own food and I am only in my early 40s. Through necessity rather than choice. People have forgotten how to do it. People have been spoiled by convenience. 30 years ago there wasn't so much convenience available so people just did what they had to do and got on with it, without any pomp and circumstance. The pomp & circumstance that surrounds the food movement these days is in danger of clouding the real issues. sigh.

Sam said...

ok - i apologize - misread - 'event' was the issue not slow food itself. oops